gravity

Talking about going to Mars. You have Earth's gravity and Martian gravity. At which point of the voyage (in miles or kilometers) starts Martian gravity to take over, and when this happens, do the passengers start to float? And if so, for how long?
Happy seasonal greetings to all.

Walter>>>

It does not sound like you have learned anything from the Moon landings!

Please read again.

yt
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Trying a search for "Earth-Mars la grange point" gives this as the first page in the list,
and this should give a person a slow entry to the concept of gravity versus variations in orbital positioning.
link
I won't venture a claim of accuracy, as the topics are only hinted at as complex, and difficult to understand, from our constant gravity living experience. We all need a few days on a space station to clear our heads about what gravity is in terms of a small vehicle in motion.
If we had a massively heavy top or bottom, far denser than the other end of our bodies, it might be we could experience some slight variation of orientation passing beyond a 'gravity balanced' point, but the smallest local perturbations of energy expressed would mask the difference to our constant gravity trained and developed senses as we exist currently.
What was that question now?
Was it about wind resistance, or impulse changes?

Walter Asks,,
Talking about going to Mars. You have Earth's gravity and Martian gravity. At which point of the voyage (in miles or kilometers) starts Martian gravity to take over, and when this happens, do the passengers start to float? And if so, for how long?
Happy seasonal greetings to all.

And seasonal Greetings back to You!!
1.When you leave Earth at five graveties,,
you will contuie to a pre-determined
Engine Shut Off.
2.You will have 9/10ths,,time in free-fall/weightlessness.
3.Upon Reaching Mars,Ship will Rotate and
fire Thrusters Toward Mars,,This will probably be the hardest G-Force in the Entire Mission.
4.Landing.As Gently as possible
5.Welcome to Mars
Joe in Texas